Tyler Hubby

Susan Archie Remembers t0ny by Table of the Elements

Susan Archie, Tony Conrad
Nashville, 2006

 

Writes Susan Archie:

Tony Conrad and me. Nashville. 2006. I loved this guy and it makes me sadder than David Bowie did. I didn't know him well but worked with him and Jeff Hunt about 10 years. When we would meet up he was always so much fun. I was driving him home (toAndy Ditzler's house) after a show and I told him I had just finished a cd for Paul Anka. It was sublime pie because I had just worked on a cd for Tony, "Thuunderboy," in which his 3 yr old son scratches and loops 45s on his toy turntable. One of the hits was Puppy Love sung by Donnie Osmond, written by Paul Anka.

“You don’t know who I am,” Mr. Conrad told The Guardian in what may have been his last interview, “but somehow, indirectly, you’ve been affected by things I did.”

Silver Ball (Light and Color, Mostly) by Table of the Elements

"Kelley is an avatar of the power and humanity inherent in recognizing the radical impurity of human experience. His art searches out dark and soiled places where defects, fault lines and inadequacies are obvious and routine, and where failure takes on the poignant, fragile, even heartbreaking beauty that accompanies any loss of self."
 Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times
 
"In a three-decade career, cut off abruptly by his suicide, at 57, last year, Kelley did it all, in terms of genre: performance, painting, drawing, printmaking, sculpture, video, installation, sound art and writing. And he wove together — twisted together — all of that into what amounted to a single conceptual project based on recurrent themes: social class, popular culture, black humor, anti-formalist rigor and, though rarely acknowledged, a moral sense, unshakably skeptical, that ran through everything like a spine."
Holland Carter, New York Times

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Jesus was a Capricorn by Jeff Hunt

"Who was the first hippie, exactly? An argument can be made that the whole peace-and-love vibe traces back to the nineteenth century and Romanticism. Faced with the tumult of the Industrial Revolution (the inevitable end result of the Age of Enlightenment), artists, musicians, and authors began dreaming of pastoral landscapes and personal idylls, in which individual heroics became transformative gestures. Getting back to nature and dropping out of society wasn’t some abrupt worldwide Zeitgeist that erupted in 1967: Lord Byron could easily be categorized as a hippie. For that matter, one could add to the list Percy Shelly, Henry David Thoreau, and Ralph Waldo Emerson. Walt Whitman was a complete hippie, for sure. But why stop there? There’s certainly one obvious candidate for Original Hippie. Maybe some of you indie-rockers have heard of the New Testament. You know, it’s in a book, called the Bible...."

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Tony Conrad Movie at Volksbühne, Berlin by Table of the Elements

When he fled Harvard in 1961, contrarian Tony Conrad escaped into the restricted ruins of post-war East Berlin. Now he returns, via Tyler Hubby’s celebratory opus, Tony Conrad: Completely in the Present. The host is Volksbühne, Germany’s most iconic theater. Is Tony rolling in his grave? We like to think he’s rolling in the aisles.

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Not Everything That Rises Must Also Converge by Jeff Hunt

“A lot of new music boasts of a good time, but it ends up being the same caffeinated sugar water in a fancy plastic bottle, completely lacking in nutrients, life, and anything that’s good for you. Peg Simone’s new music begins from pure places like poetry, the spoken word, the human breath, feedback, the mystical side of folk and blues, and the effect is icy water coming off the mountain, tasting of soil, rock and organic matter; you want to drink it and let it drip down your neck.”
Black Francis (The Pixies)

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